Mine Shuttle Car Operators

Description

Operate diesel or electric-powered shuttle car in underground mine to transport materials from working face to mine cars or conveyor.

Tasks

  • Control conveyors that run the entire length of shuttle cars in order to distribute loads as loading progresses.
  • Drive loaded shuttle cars to ramps, and move controls in order to discharge loads into mine cars or onto conveyors.
  • Clean, fuel, and service equipment, and repair and replace parts as necessary.
  • Move mine cars into position for loading and unloading, using pinchbars inserted under car wheels to position cars under loading spouts.
  • Guide and stop cars by switching, applying brakes, or placing scotches (wooden wedges) between wheels and rails.
  • Push or ride cars down slopes, or hook cars to cables and control cable drum brakes, in order to ease cars down inclines.
  • Observe hand signals, grade stakes, or other markings when operating machines.
  • Open and close bottom doors of cars in order to dump contents.
  • Direct other workers to move stakes, place blocks, position anchors or cables, or move materials.
  • Monitor loading processes in order to ensure that materials are loaded according to specifications.
  • Measure, weigh, or verify levels of rock, gravel, or other excavated material in order to prevent equipment overloads.
  • Read written instructions or confer with supervisors about schedules and materials to be moved.
  • Maintain records of materials moved.

Knowledge

Design
Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
Food Production
Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.

Skills

Systems Evaluation
Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.
Technology Design
Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs.
Systems Analysis
Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.
Management of Material Resources
Obtaining and seeing to the appropriate use of equipment, facilities, and materials needed to do certain work.
Operations Analysis
Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Management of Financial Resources
Determining how money will be spent to get the work done, and accounting for these expenditures.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.

Abilities

Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Buggy Driver
Buggy Operator
Buggy Runner
Car Dropper
Car Dumper
Car Pincher
Cart Driver
Coal Hauler Operator
Monitor Car Operator
Ram Car Operator
Shuttle Buggy Operator
Shuttle Car Operator
Shuttle Operator

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$25.05 hourly, $52,110 annual.
Employment (2008):
2,990 employees