Postal Service Clerks

Description

Perform any combination of tasks in a post office, such as receive letters and parcels; sell postage and revenue stamps, postal cards, and stamped envelopes; fill out and sell money orders; place mail in pigeon holes of mail rack or in bags; and examine mail for correct postage.

Tasks

  • Keep money drawers in order, and record and balance daily transactions.
  • Weigh letters and parcels; compute mailing costs based on type, weight, and destination; and affix correct postage.
  • Obtain signatures from recipients of registered or special delivery mail.
  • Register, certify, and insure letters and parcels.
  • Sell and collect payment for products such as stamps, prepaid mail envelopes, and money orders.
  • Check mail in order to ensure correct postage and that packages and letters are in proper condition for mailing.
  • Answer questions regarding mail regulations and procedures, postage rates, and post office boxes.
  • Complete forms regarding changes of address, or theft or loss of mail, or for special services such as registered or priority mail.
  • Provide assistance to the public in complying with federal regulations of Postal Service and other federal agencies.
  • Sort incoming and outgoing mail, according to type and destination, by hand or by operating electronic mail-sorting and scanning devices.
  • Cash money orders.
  • Rent post office boxes to customers.
  • Put undelivered parcels away, retrieve them when customers come to claim them, and complete any related documentation.
  • Provide customers with assistance in filing claims for mail theft, or lost or damaged mail.
  • Respond to complaints regarding mail theft, delivery problems, and lost or damaged mail, filling out forms and making appropriate referrals for investigation.
  • Receive letters and parcels, and place mail into bags.
  • Feed mail into postage canceling devices or hand stamp mail to cancel postage.
  • Transport mail from one work station to another.
  • Set postage meters, and calibrate them to ensure correct operation.
  • Post announcements or government information on public bulletin boards.

Knowledge

Sociology and Anthropology
Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.
Philosophy and Theology
Knowledge of different philosophical systems and religions. This includes their basic principles, values, ethics, ways of thinking, customs, practices, and their impact on human culture.
Therapy and Counseling
Knowledge of principles, methods, and procedures for diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of physical and mental dysfunctions, and for career counseling and guidance.
History and Archeology
Knowledge of historical events and their causes, indicators, and effects on civilizations and cultures.

Skills

Equipment Selection
Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Technology Design
Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

Abilities

Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Response Orientation
The ability to choose quickly between two or more movements in response to two or more different signals (lights, sounds, pictures). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body part.
Spatial Orientation
The ability to know your location in relation to the environment or to know where other objects are in relation to you.
Peripheral Vision
The ability to see objects or movement of objects to one's side when the eyes are looking ahead.
Night Vision
The ability to see under low light conditions.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Reaction Time
The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
Rate Control
The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.

Work Activities

Staffing Organizational Units
Recruiting, interviewing, selecting, hiring, and promoting employees in an organization.

Interests

Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.

Work Style

Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Social Orientation
Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.

Work Values

Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

Lay Titles

Accountable Clerk
Assistant
Bulk Mail Clerk
Bulk Mail Entry Unit Technician (BMEU Tech)
Bulk Mail Technician
Business Mail Entry Clerk
Clerk
Counter Clerk
Delivery Clerk
Distribution Clerk
Dock Clerk
Mail Agent
Mail Caller
Mail Clerk
Mail Handler
Mail Order Clerk
Mailing Clerk
Mailroom Clerk
Money Order Clerk
Nixie Clerk
Parcel Post Clerk
Part Time Flexible Clerk (PTF Clerk)
Post Office Clerk
Postal Clerk
Postal Retail Clerk
Postal Service Clerk
Postal Worker
Sales and Distribution Clerk
Sales and Service Associate (SSA)
Sales Associate
Special Delivery Clerk
Stamp Clerk
Window Clerk
Window/Distribution Clerk

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$25.53 hourly, $53,090 annual.
Employment (2008):
69,310 employees